Girl Friends

[translated text]

When I take the call from Taki—which I didn’t want to take, but anyway—I’m naked. It’s a fine Saturday afternoon.

“Momoko?” Taki says. “So, tonight, would it be all right if I brought a friend?”

“A friend?” I cautiously check behind me. Masahiko is lying rigid, face down on the bed.

“Yeah, her name’s Asumi, she’s a friend from college. She’s living in Oita now, but happens to be back in town, so we wanted to catch up, but tonight’s the only night she can do.”

I take the cordless phone into the kitchen, get a plastic bottle of iced tea out of the fridge, and take it back to the bed to try to sweeten Masahiko up. I know it’s already too late, but it’s better than nothing. I offer him the bottle, silently mouthing “want some?” but a glare is all I get in response.

“She’s a nice girl. Okay, so we can’t really say ‘girl’ anymore at our age, can we?” Taki laughs in self-mockery.

I open the bottle, take a reluctant sip myself. The cold tea slides down my throat. When I close my eyes, I see a pale yellow trembling behind my eyelids. I murmur sotto voce “mmm, good,” and perch on the edge of the bed.

“I think you’d get along well, she’s been through a lot…” Taki is going on to say something more but I cut her off, saying, “Of course, it’s fine. I don’t mind at all if your friend joins us.”  I force artificial brightness into my voice. “At seven, right? Looking forward to it!”

The second I push the button to end the call, I am kicked off the bed. The force of the blow sends the phone flying out of my hand, and it smashes into the wall, knocking the battery cover off. For such a violent impact, it doesn’t hurt that much. That’s the first thing I think, down on my hands and knees. My carpet-burned knees, stinging furiously, are about the extent of it.

“Oh, for fuck’s sake, what are you kicking me for?” I demand, getting up quickly. If I linger, cowering on the floor, I’ll get kicked again—or rather, stomped on. “Weren’t you the one who told me to answer the phone?”

I take a strong stance so I don’t get sucked under by the fear. Act angry and complain.

“I said if it was anything important, they’d call back, and you said to shut up and answer it! Did you forget all about that?”

Almost the whole bottle I was clutching has been spilled on the floor, but somehow the short beige fibres of the carpet have only changed color in one place.

“You’re unbelievable,” I mutter, going to the kitchen to get a cloth. I stomp my feet extra loud—because I’m not terrified; I’m angry.

*     *     *

Tofu rice: put chilled, firm tofu on top of rice, sprinkle a lot of chives on it, add soy sauce, and break the tofu into chunks as you eat. It’s one of Masahiko’s favourite foods, and it’s a way of eating tofu I’d never heard of until I met him.

“It’s ready!” I call, and Masahiko switches off the TV program he’s watching. The TV is turned off at meal times. I asked him to do that soon after we started living together and even now he doesn’t forget.

“Looks good,” he says.

On the table there are two servings of tofu rice, freshly-made roasted green tea, chopsticks, and chopstick rests. Today’s chopstick rests are shaped like morning glories: Masahiko’s is aqua blue, mine is pink.

We sit facing each other and say “itadakimasu” together, giving thanks for the food, and it’s so peaceful, without a trace of violence (if you ignore my knees, grazed red with mild carpet-burn). Even so, I am taking care not to turn my back on him, and I think he’s aware of it too. He never kicks me if I’m facing him. Always from behind, and lately almost always in the behind or lower. (Once, I was kicked in the back so hard I got whiplash. I couldn’t breathe and it hurt like hell, and then the cast had to stay on for such a long time, and I complained and cried so much that afterwards he was more careful.) So even in this heat, I can’t go out with my legs bare. The marks left by his heels are all over the place, black and blue, yellow; bruises on bruises, black and blue again.

“Remind me again, what time are you going out tonight?” Masahiko asks.

“About six.” As I reply, I realize I don’t even feel like going out. But on the other hand, I know that if I decide not to, it’s guaranteed to put him in a bad mood.

“And what time will you be back?”

It’s beyond my understanding, but Masahiko is like that. If I say I’m going out on my days off, he’ll be highly offended, bellow at me or pull the silent treatment, even kick me if he finds the slightest excuse, but for all that, if I do go out, he seems to look forward to the time I’ll be away for.

“I’m not sure. It’s hard to say,” I reply vaguely.

If I give a definite time, and then end up coming home earlier or later than that, obviously he’ll get upset, and even if I return exactly on time, he’ll be annoyed (probably because his reason for getting upset has been stolen from him).

“But can you give me a rough idea?” he persists.

If anything, he’s in a good mood now. Enough so that when he asks me again what time I’ll be home, and I don’t answer, he looks amused, saying, “Lately, you’ve wised up.”

*     *     *

It’s been six years since we first met, and four years since we started living together. It was not long after we moved in together that Masahiko showed his violent side. Usually, it’s the kicks, but every now and again, he grabs me by the hair and yanks me down to the floor, and stomps on my face and head. He never hits with his closed fist. He does slap sometimes. I’m being physically abused, but I haven’t left him, and even I don’t understand why.

For dinner out with girl friends, I choose a black tank top and jeans. A red pashmina in case it’s cold.

“Looks like rain.”

I flinch at the sudden voice from behind me. “Rain? Even though it was so fine?”

Masahiko doesn’t reply to that. “You look nice,” he says instead, with an unusually sincere look on his face.

“Of course I do,” I tease.

He’s so sincere—and even inexplicably sweet—it’s creepy.

“What?” I ask. I’m in front of the wash basin, and he’s standing there in the doorway as if blocking the entrance. Our conversation has ground to a halt, but he’s still there.

“Nothing,” he says.

Suddenly, I understand. He’s making sure of me. If I’ve calmed down or not; if I intend to come back here—as a matter of course—at the end of the night; if I’m all emotional and about to go out and confide in my girl friends.

I don’t know, I feel like telling him. I mean, people’s feelings are such fluid things, aren’t they? You never can tell which way they’ll go.

“What are you thinking?” he asks.

Instead of telling him any of that, I give him a blank look. “You’re acting strange,” I say, like I’m not thinking of anything at all.

*     *     *

Outside, it really looks like it’s going to rain. A tepid breeze is scattering the fallen leaves.

“Typhoon?” I wonder, opening the door. I grab a black umbrella that comes to hand.  “Lend me your umbrella, it goes with my outfit.”

What if this umbrella turns out to be—I turn to wave goodbye, and the vivid thought leaps into my mind—a souvenir, or a memento? If I decided not to come back here tonight, or tomorrow, or the day after tomorrow, or any other day.

I’m going to get the bus to the train station, and from there I’ll take two different trains to get to the restaurant we’re meeting at. As soon as I get on the bus, the rain starts to fall, beating down heavily in no time. Generally speaking, this is terrible weather for going out in, but I’m exhilarated. I want it to keep raining and raining—raining so hard that no one can make it home.

The Chinese restaurant called “N” is on the second floor, up a narrow stairway. I put the drenched umbrella in the umbrella stand, open the door, and I’m immediately engulfed by the steamy smells of fried food and chili oil. Looking around the semi-crowded interior, I spot Taki, solitary in a seat by the window. Her long straight black hair draws the eye: so luxuriant it’s weighty.

As I approach, I call out, “Long time no see!” and take the seat facing hers. “Isn’t the rain terrible?”

Taki already has a mug of beer in her hand. She grins when she sees me. “Yeah, crazy rain. This year we’ve had so much rain.”

“Where’s your friend?”

“She’ll be a little late. Sorry for the short notice,” and she raises her voice to call for service, ordering me a beer.

We met in first grade. It was a private school with a unified school program all the way up to university, so we thought we’d be at school together for sixteen years, except that Taki, who had consistently bad grades from primary school onward, couldn’t pass the internal examination, and ended up going to a different junior college. Still, we’ve kept in touch, we’re now both thirty-seven, and Taki has her own beauty therapy business, while my claim to fame is that I’m supporting my unemployed de facto.

“How’s everything going?”

The beer arrives, we clink our mugs together, and start to quiz each other. “Just the usual,” “Same as always,”—the answers to the questions don’t really matter at all. “But you look great—” “Yeah, I’m good, really good.” Chatting away in this vein, we laugh.

The strange thing is that when we meet up after not seeing each other for a while, it always takes us right back into primary school mode, even though we went to school together all the way up until high school. The atmosphere of the classroom, the teacher, the playground, the morning assembly platform, the younger self who struggled to fit in with everyone else.

Snacking on the restaurant’s specialty, gyoza dumplings—both fried and steamed—we launch into chat about this and that. From Taki’s trip to Okinawa last month with her boyfriend (“Wow, Okinawa, I’m jealous!”), to my sister getting married next year (“No way, little Nana? So fast!”), to the manicurist at Taki’s salon quitting out of the blue (“She just up and left? Girls these days, no common sense,”), up to the addition of mammograms to my company’s regular health check-ups (“Regular health checks, huh? I own my own business, so I don’t have anything like that”). Outside the window, the rain is getting stronger, and I hear thunder.

We’re well on the way to finishing off our second beers, when a high-pitched voice squeals, “Takiii!” and a curvaceous woman appears right beside us. Taki stands up too, and they throw their arms around each other, shrieking happily, “ohhh!” and “I missed you!” Something Asumi has on—a perfume, or some kind of cosmetic—tickles my nose with the sweet scent of baby powder.

“Have a seat!” Taki gives up her seat to Asumi, and takes the aisle seat for herself. “This is Momoko, my oldest friend.”

As I’m introduced by Taki, my eyes are not fixed on Asumi’s face, but nailed to her cleavage. Her snow-white, unbelievably ample cleavage.

“This is Asumi Itakura, who I told you about on the phone. She met a man from Oita back in junior college; they had a long distance relationship and ended up getting married, and now she lives in Oita.”

Asumi is vibrantly beautiful, with fine, regular features: womanly, that seems like the right way to describe her. Her greeting and body language are free and easy, and she comes across as naturally friendly. The way she takes a long, deep first mouthful of beer, the gifts of souvenirs she produces from a paper bag (yuzu pepper sauce, kabosu citron fruit, dried flounder, and peat soap), not just for Taki but for me, the stranger, as well—you could call it generosity, or a bit over the top.

And, her boobs. For the life of me, I can’t help my eyes from being drawn to them. Her bosom, swelling up big and round as if about to overflow the daringly low-cut white T-shirt, is accentuated by a long necklace dangling down in the shape of a Y.

Two years have passed since Asumi and Taki last met, and they have an endless supply of talk and laughter. Every so often, Taki makes an effort to include me, saying something like, “Momoko has a toyboy,” or “Momoko’s really good at skiing,” and taking my cue, I confirm it, deny it, or laugh, but before I know it I’m staring at the breasts in front of me again. What a rack. If Masahiko was here, he’d definitely say something like that. I’m seized with the impulse to touch them. When the bra is off and they return to their natural state, I imagine how they’d be, gently swaying—right down to the soft weight and coolness when tenderly lifting them from below with both hands.

“So, how did you meet this guy, Momoko?”

I hear Asumi’s voice, and quickly pull myself back into the conversation. “At my previous job, we were co-workers. The usual way.”

“Co-workers? So, back then, he had a job, huh?”

Through the glass, I see a far-off streak of lightning, followed by a huge crack of thunder. Taki ducks her head. “The trains might be stopped,” she says.

“Yeah,” I reply to Asumi, “I resigned from that company before he did, and switched to my current job. It’s a totally different industry though.”

Taki cuts in, explaining, “Momoko works at a movie distribution company. Her previous company made educational materials, isn’t that right?”

“Right,” I take up the narrative. “When we worked at the same company, we weren’t particularly close, but shortly after I changed jobs, I got this phone call out of the blue.”

“Was it him?”

“Yeah, it was him.”

Asumi squeals like a school girl. “It happens that way sometimes, doesn’t it? When people miss each other, they recognize their true feelings for the first time.”

Anyway, I can’t remember so well. So, I skip most of it, and to sum up, I tell them, “When we were dating, he quit his job, and to save on living costs, we decided to move in together.” Which brings things up to the present day.

“You’re so cool, supporting your man. It’s a labor of love, isn’t it?” Asumi says admiringly. “You know, for me, it’s just…” and she goes on to cheerfully describe her uphill struggle in an unfamiliar place, the bickering with her husband, the problems with the children’s schooling, and her daily feeling of powerlessness, mixed in with jokes.

“Must be tough,” we sympathize.

But my eyes and thoughts keep gravitating to her lush breasts, incongruous in the difficult circumstances she describes. Does her husband—“fairly seriously estranged,” as she calls him—bury his face in those breasts?

We chatter on. Changing to Shaoxing rice wine, we devour more gyoza, stir-fried pea sprouts, then sweet-and-sour pork and fried rice. Asumi talks the most and laughs the hardest of the three of us. Her very existence warms and lights up the air of the restaurant. I feel like I am watching something beautiful, something fine, which at the same time I know myself to be completely incompatible with. It’s like we belong to different species.

“About Masahiko,” I say abruptly. “He kicks me.” It’s a declaration. “Actually, he kicks me goddamn hard.”

Silence falls. As I can’t take my eyes off Asumi’s breasts, it must look like I’m addressing the breasts, not talking to Taki or Asumi.

“Does he?” Taki’s tone is troubled.

“Yeah, he does,” I reply, and smile, still looking at the breasts. The white, rounded, beautiful breasts.

“You mean, he’s abusing you?” This time it’s Asumi’s voice.

“Yeah, it’s abuse.” I think, why did my voice just sound so cheerful? Ah, I can’t wait to tell Masahiko about everything I’ve seen today. Taki’s long black hair, the bracelet bought for me in Okinawa, Asumi’s paper bag of souvenirs, and this amazing rack. Masahiko will be so interested in these details which are so far removed from us.

With a light heart—pleasantly high—I drain my Shaoxing rice wine. It seems very quiet, and then I notice that at some point, the rain had cleared up.

[original text]

女友達

(KAORI EKUNI: 江國 香織)

多喜ちゃんからの電話にでたとき――でたくなかったのだけれど、それはともかく――、私は裸だった。晴れた土曜日のお昼すぎ。「百々子?」多喜ちゃんは言った。「あのね、きょうなんだけど、友達を一人連れて行ってもいいかな」「友達?」訊き返しながら、私はおそるおそるうしろを見る。雅彦はベッドに横になったまま、うつぶせの姿勢でじっとしていた。「うん、短大のときの友達で明日美っていうんだけど、いま大分に住んでいて、でもたまたまこっちに帰ってきててね、会おうってことになったんだけど、都合のあう日がきょうしかなくて」私は子機を持ったまま台所に行き、冷蔵庫からお茶のペットボトルをだして、雅彦の機嫌をとるためにベッドに戻る。機嫌をとるにはもう遅いことはわかっていたけれど、それでも何もしないよりはいいと思ったのだ。(のむ?)声にださず、表情と口の動きだけで問いかけ、ペットボトルをさしだしたけれど睨まれただけだった。「いい子よ。まあ、いい子って年でもないけどね、私たち」多喜ちゃんが自嘲して笑う。私はペットボトルのふたをあけ、仕方なく自分で一口のんだ。お茶はつめたく喉をすべる。目をつぶると、まぶたの裏に薄い黄色が揺れる気がした。(おいしいよ)今度は小声でこっそりと言い、ベッドに浅く腰掛けた。「彼女もいろいろあって大変で、だから百々子とも話が合うと思うのよ」多喜ちゃんがさらに何か言いかけるのをさえぎって、「勿論いいよ」と私は言った。「そのお友達と一緒でも、私は全然構わない」それから空々しくあかるい声をだす。「七時だよね、たのしみ」
通話の終了ボタンを押した途端に、ベッドから蹴り落とされた。はずみで子機が手から飛びだし、壁にぶつかって電池入れのふたがはずれた。衝撃の強さのわりには痛くなかった。それが、四つんばいになった私の、最初に思ったことだった。絨緞で擦ってしまった両膝が、ひどくぴりぴりするくらいで。
「もー、なんで蹴るかなあ」
立ち上がって私は言った。ぐずぐずうずくまっていれば、もう一度蹴られる――というか、踏まれる――からだ。
「電話にでろって言ったのは雅彦でしょう?」
恐怖に呑みこまれないために、私は強者の立場をとる。怒って文句を言う立場を。
「用事があればまたかかってくるから放っておこうって言ったのに、いいからでろって言ったでしょう?忘れちゃったの?」
なぜだかしっかり握りしめたままだったペットボトルの中身はほとんど床にこぼれて、毛足の短い生成色の絨緞が、そこだけ色を変えていた。
「信じられないなあ、もう」
呟いて、台所に雑巾をとりに行く。わざとどかどか歩いた。私は怯えているわけじゃなく、怒っているのだから。

ごはんにつめたい木綿豆腐をのせ、たっぷりの浅葱を散らし、しょうゆをかけて、豆腐をくずしながら食べる「豆腐ごはん」は雅彦の好物で、そういう食べ方があることを、そもそも私は雅彦に出会うまで知らなかった。
「できましたー」
声をかけると、雅彦は見ていたテレビを消した。食事をするときにはテレビを消して。一緒に暮らし始めてすぐに私が頼んだことを、いまでも雅彦は忘れていない。
「うまそう」
テーブルの上には二人分の「豆腐ごはん」と淹れたてのほうじ茶、箸を箸置きがのっている。きょうの箸置きは朝顔のかたちで、雅彦のが水色、私のがピンクだ。
「いただきます」
向いあって坐り、口々に言う私たちはひどく長閑で、そこに暴力の痕跡はない(赤く擦りむけ、軽い火傷をした私の膝を除けば)。それでも私は雅彦に背中を向けないように気をつけているし、そのことに、たぶん雅彦も気づいている。彼は私を、決して正面から蹴らない。いつもうしろからで、最近は大抵お尻から下だ(一度、背中を激しく蹴られて、私は鞭打ち症になった。あのときは息ができず、ものすごく痛かったし、その後ながいことギプスがとれず、恨みごとを言ったり泣いたりしたので、それからは気をつけてくれているのだ)。この暑いのに、だから私は素足で外出することができない。雅彦の踵がぶちこまれた跡が、青黒く、黄色く、重ねてまた青黒く、そこらじゅうについているから。
「きょう、何時にでるんだっけ」
雅彦に訊かれ、
「六時ごろ」
と私はこたえる。こたえながら、自分が行きたくないと感じていることに気づく。けれどその一方で、もし私が今夜でかけるのをやめにしたら、誰よりもまず雅彦が不機嫌になることもわかっていた。
「それで、何時ごろに帰るの?」
私には理解できないのだが、雅彦というのはそういう人だ。休日に私がでかけると言うと機嫌をそこね、怒鳴ったり黙り込んだり、口実が見つかれば蹴ったりもするくせに、それでもでかけるとなると、今度は突然、私のいない時間がたのしみになるらしい。
「どうだろう。はっきりわからないな」
曖昧にこたえた。具体的な時間を言って、それより遅くなったり早くなったりすれば雅彦が怒ることは目に見えているし、その時間ぴったりに帰れば帰ったで(おそらく怒る理由を奪われたために)、やはりむくれるに決まっていたから。
「でも、だいたい何時ごろなの?」
けれどいま、雅彦はむしろ機嫌がいい。帰宅時間を重ねて訊かれ、私がこたえずにいると、
「最近ちょっと賢くなったな」
と、おもしろそうに言うくらいに。
私たちは、出会って六年、一緒に暮し始めて四年になる。雅彦の暴力癖は、暮し始めるとすぐに露呈した。いちばん多いのは蹴りだけれど、髪の毛をつかんで床に私をひき倒し、顔や頭を踏みつける、というのもしばしばする。こぶしで殴ることはしない。平手ではたくことはある。実際に怪我をさせられているのに、この男となぜ別れないのか、自分でも謎だ。
女友達と夕食に、私は黒いタンクトップとジーンズを選んだ。冷房対策として、赤いストール。
「雨降りそうだよ」
いきなりうしろから声をかけられ、びくりとする。
「雨?あんなに晴れてたのに?」
雅彦はそれにはこたえずに、
「似合うじゃん」
と言った。めずらしく真面目な顔で。
「あたりまえじゃん」
私は茶化す。真面目な――しかもそこはかとなくやさしい――雅彦というのは不気味だ。
「なに?」
私は洗面台の前にいて、雅彦は入口をふさぐ恰好で立っている。会話が途切れてもじっとそこにいるので尋ねると、
「べつに」
と、こたえる。ふいに私は理解した。この人はいまたしかめているのだ。私が落着いているかどうか、夜遊びを終えたらまたここに――当然――戻ってくるつもりかどうか、へんに感情を高ぶらせ、女友達に何か相談したりしないかどうか。
それはわからないな。私はほとんどそう言いそうになる。だって、人に気持ちなんて不安定なものでしょう?どこでどうなるかわからないのよ、と。
「なんなの?」
かわりに私はきょとんとしてみせる。何も考えていないふりをして、
「へんな雅彦」
と、言う。
おもては、ほんとうに雨が降ってきそうだった。生ぬるい風が落ち葉を転がしている。
「台風?」
ドアをあけた私は言い、手近にあった黒い傘をとった。
「貸してね。きょうの服に合うし」
もしかしたらこれが――ふり向いて手をふり、いきなり鮮烈にはっきりと私は思う――記念品というか思い出の品になるのかもしれない。今夜私がここに帰らず、あしたもあさってもその先もずっと、帰らないことに決めれば。
駅まではバスに乗り、約束の店までは、そこから電車を二本乗り継ぐ。バスに乗ってすぐ雨が降り始め、たちまち土砂降りになった。普段なら出歩くのが億劫な天気で、でも私は爽快だと思った。じゃんじゃん降ればいいと思った。誰一人家に帰れないくらい、激しく降ればいいと思った。
Nという名の中華料理屋は、狭い階段をのぼった二階にある。ずぶ濡れの傘を傘立てに立てて扉をあけると、炒めものとラー油の、むうっと熱い匂いがした。ほどほどに混んだ店内を見まわすと、窓際の席の一つに多喜ちゃんがぽつんと坐っている。重たげなほど豊かで長くまっすぐな、黒い髪が人目をひく。
「ひさしぶり」
近づいて声をかけ、多喜ちゃんの正面に坐った。「すごい雨だね」
多喜ちゃんは、すでにビールのジョッキを手にしている。私を見るとにっこりし、「うん、すごい雨。今年は多いね、こういうの」と、言った。「お友達は?」「ちょっと遅れるみたい。ごめんね、急に」そしていきなり「すみません」と声を張り、私のビールを注文してくれる。
私たちは、小学校一年生のときに出会った。大学まで一貫教育の私立校で、だからその先十六年間一緒に通うものだと思っていたのだけれど、小学校から一貫して成績の悪かった多喜ちゃんは、内部審査を通過できずに、よその短大に行ったのだった。それでもこうして三十七になるまで私たちは会い続け、いまや多喜ちゃんは自分の店を持つエステティシャンで、私はといえば無職の男を養っている。
「その後どうよ」
ビールが運ばれ、ごつんとジョッキを合わせると、私たちは互いに質問をしあう。「あいかわらずかな」「変りばえしないな」質問のこたえはどうでもいいのだ。「でも元気そう」「うん、元気元気」そんなふうに言って笑う。不思議なのは、多喜ちゃんとは高校まで一緒に学校に通ったのに、ひさしぶりに会うと決まって小学生の気分を思いだすことだ。教室の空気や担任教師や、校庭や朝礼台や、周囲に馴染めずにいた自分自身を。
この店の名物である餃子――焼いたのと、茹でたのと――をつまみながら、私たちは身辺のあれこれを勢いよく話す。多喜ちゃんが先月恋人と沖縄にでかけたこと(「いいないいなー、沖縄いいなー」)、私の妹が来年結婚すること(「ひゃあ、奈々ちゃんが?早いねえ」)、多喜ちゃんのエステの、ネイリストがいきなり店を辞めてしまったこと(「いきなり?非常識だよね、最近の子って」)、私の会社の定期健康診断に、マンモグラフィーが加わったこと(「定期健康診断かあ。私は個人事業主だから、そういうのないんだよね」)まで。窓の外では雨がさらに勢いを増し、雷まで聞こえた。
二つ目のジョッキが空きかけたころ、
「お多喜!」
というかん高い声がして、大柄な女の人がすぐ横に立った。多喜ちゃんも立ち上がり、二人は賑やかに抱擁する。きゃあ、とか、会いたかった、とか、嬉しそうに叫びあって。明日美さんのつけている何か――香水とか、化粧品とか――の、ベビーパウダーに似た甘い匂いが私の鼻をくすぐる。
「どうぞ掛けて」
多喜ちゃんは奥の席を明日美さんに譲り、自分は通路側にずれて坐った。
「私のいちばん古い友達の百々子」
多喜ちゃんに紹介されたとき、私の目は、でも明日美さんの顔ではなく、胸に釘づけになってしまった。白い、信じられないほど豊かな胸。
「電話で話した板倉明日美さん。短大時代に知りあった大分の男性と、遠距離恋愛の果てに結婚して、いまは大分に住んでいるの」
明日美さんは目鼻立ちの整った、迫力のある美人で、女らしい、という形容がふさわしそうだった。気さくな人柄でもあるらしく、挨拶も動作もさばさばしている。ビールの最初の一口を、ながながたっぷりのんだところも、紙袋からとりだした様々なお土産――柚胡椒、かぼす、城下かれいの一夜干し、泥炭石けん――を、多喜ちゃんばかりか初対面の私にまで、惜しげもなく――というか、べつな言い方をすればかなり強引かつ一方的に――くれたところも。
そして、おっぱい。私の目はどうしても、そこに吸い寄せられてしまう。大胆な胸あきの白いTシャツ、こぼれそうに大きくまるく盛り上がった乳房を、Y字形にたれさがるロングネックレスが強調している。
会うのは二年ぶりだという明日美さんと多喜ちゃんの、果てしないお喋りとくすくす笑い。「百々子は居候を養ってるのよ」とか、「百々子はスキー得意なのよ」とか、ときどき気を遣った多喜ちゃんに水を向けられ、肯定したり否定したり笑ったりしながら、でも気がつくと私はまた、目の前の乳房に見とれている。すげえシロモノ。雅彦なら間違いなくそう言うだろう。私はそれに、触れてみたい衝動にかられる。ブラジャーをはずし、自然な状態に戻したとき、ゆったりと揺れるだろうそれを想像してみる。両手で下からそっと持ち上げたときの、やわらかな重みやひんやりした感触まで。
「で、百々子さんはその人と、どんなふうに知り合ったの?」
明日美さんの声が聞こえて、私はいそいで会話を追いつく。
「前の職場の同僚。ありきたりなの」
「同僚?じゃあそのときは、その人にも職があったわけよね」
ガラス越しに遠くの稲光が見え、続いてひときわ大きな雷が鳴った。多喜ちゃんが首をすくめて、
「電車、とまっちゃうかもしれないわね」
と、言う。
「うん」
私は明日美さんにこたえる。
「私が先にそこを辞めたの。いまの会社に転職して。全然違う業種だったんだけど」
言いかけた私をさえぎって、
「百々子は映画の配給会社にお勤めなの」
と、多喜ちゃんが説明した。
「最初の会社は、学習教材をつくる会社だったよね、たしか」
「そう」
私はあとをひきとる。
「おなじ会社にいたときには特別親しくなかったのに、転職してしばらくしたら、突然電話がかかってきたの」
「彼から?」
「そう、彼から」
明日美さんは、女学生みたいに「きゃあ」と言う。「そういうことってあるのよねえ、会えなくなってはじめてわかる、みたいなこと」
私には、でももうはっきり思いだすことができない。それであいだを思いきり割愛して、
「何度かデートしてるうちに彼が仕事を辞めちゃって、生活費を節約するために一緒に暮そうってことになって」
いまに至るの、と話した。
「男の人を養ってるなんて恰好いいわ。愛のなせる業だわねえ」
感心したように明日美さんは言って、「それにひきかえ私なんて」と、慣れない土地での悪戦苦闘や夫との口論、子供の教育問題やら日々の無力感やらを、冗談めかせて朗らかに語る。
「大変なのね」
私たちは同情した。けれど私の目も心も、その大変な境遇に不似合いに、華やかで瑞々しい彼女の胸に何度でも吸い寄せられてしまう。「けっこう真剣に不仲」だという彼女の夫は、あのおっぱいに顔をうめたりするのだろうか。
私たちはさらに喋った。紹興酒にきりかえ、追加の餃子を食べ豆苗炒めを食べ、酢豚を食べ炒飯を食べた。明日美さんは、三人のうちでもいちばんよく喋りよく笑った。存在自体が場の雰囲気を温かにし、華やかにした。私は何か美しいもの、立派なものを見ている気持ちになり、同時に自分とは決して相容れないものを感じる。違う動物だと感じる。
「雅彦はね」
唐突に私は口をひらいた。
「私のことをすぐ蹴るのよ」
堂々とした言い方になった。
「それも半端じゃない蹴り方なの」
沈黙がおりる。私は明日美さんの胸から目を逸らせずにいるので、多喜ちゃんでも明日美さんでもなく、明日美さんの胸に向って話しているみたいに見えたと思う。
「そうなの?」
困惑した声音で多喜ちゃんが訊き、
「そうなの」
とこたえてにっこり微笑んだときにも、私は胸を見ていた。白い、まるい、美しい胸を。
「それって、あれ?暴力?」
今度は明日美さんの声だ。
「そう、暴力」
私はなぜだか愉しげに聞こえる声で言い、ああ、早く雅彦にきょう見たもののことを話したい、と思った。多喜ちゃんの黒い長い髪、沖縄で買ってもらったという腕輪、明日美さんのお土産入りの紙袋、そしてこのすげえシロモノ。雅彦なら一緒におもしろがってくれるはずの、私たちから遠いあれこれ。
私は軽やかな気持ちで――いっそうきうきと――紹興酒をのみ干す。随分静かだと思ったら、いつのまにか雨はあがっていた。

Onna Tomodachi © 2008 by Kaori Ekuni
First published in Japanese magazine Yasei Jidai by Kadokawa, Tokyo

Translator’s Statement 

I first fell in love with Kaori Ekuni’s work when I read this story many years ago. I was struck by her masterly representation of dysfunctional relationships that possess their own unique internal logic. She excels at conveying emotional complexity, which I believe is perhaps one of the most difficult things to capture in translation. I would love to translate more of her prolific body of work, which I feel deserves to be more widely known in the English-speaking world.

Kaori Ekuni is an award-winning, prolific Japanese author known as “the female Murakami,” who has not been much translated into English. She is a writer who works somewhat outside the traditional Japanese literary canon, often portraying complex, dysfunctional relationships.

Sharni Wilson is an award-winning New Zealand writer of fiction and a Japanese-to-English literary translator based in London. Her work has appeared in Landfall, Pidgeonholes, and Asymptote’s “Translation Tuesdays,” among others. She can be found at sharniwilson.com.